I Love Oprah, But I Don’t Think She Should Be President

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By Jillian Stacia

Before we start, let’s get one thing straight: I love Oprah. I am a big Oprah fan. I’ve watched her show, listened to her podcasts, joined her book club. I’m all about Super Soul Sunday and Dr. Phil and the OWN network. I think Oprah is an enlightened, kind, and intelligent individual. But I don’t think she should run for president, simply because she has no experience.

I know “experience” seems like an outdated concept these days. When it comes to presidential candidates, it’s more like an added bonus instead of a requirement. Call me old fashioned, but I think the president of the United States should have some previous experience in government. Continue reading

Why The Words Of MLK Should Still Spur Us Into Action Today

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By Catherine Miele

One of the biggest struggles I’ve grappled with since Donald Trump’s election and inauguration has been this: respecting the office of the presidency.

When President Obama was in office, it always angered me to hear people question his citizenship and speak of him in a derogatory, racist manner, especially since I believe President Obama truly cared for the country and was a superb leader.

Having different social and political views from many of my family and neighbors, I endured a plethora of hate-filled rhetoric about one of the men I most admire. Continue reading

An Open Letter to Sarah Huckabee Sanders, From a Survivor of Assault

Sarah Huckabee Sanders

By Christie Page

Dear Sarah Huckabee Sanders,

It is finally time I penned this letter to you directly. I have spent quite some time deciding on the tone of this letter and what I want to reflect. Most importantly, I have asked myself if I were you, what would I need to hear to empathize with the plight of millions of women who have bravely come forward in an effort to be heard?

I wonder about you. I wonder if in those moments when you are alone in your car on your commute to work, or when you first wake up in the morning before your feet hit the ground, if ever there is a time when you say to yourself: “I can’t do this anymore.” Continue reading

Those Were the Days: 5 Old School TV Shows We Need Back Today

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By Eliza David

2017 has been a trip and that’s putting it mildly. Natural disasters, domestic terrorism, criminal investigations of people ranging from Hollywood moguls to the President himself – what hasn’t this year thrown our way that wasn’t the absolute worst?

A: The return of Will & Grace.

When I heard whispers about one of my favorite shows on the planet coming back to television, I wasn’t ready. We were in the throes of the most ridiculous presidential campaigns in recent American history, so it’s safe to say that my mind was elsewhere. Then the mini-episode dropped and my heart warmed for the first time in months. The nostalgia was needed and appreciated during that wacky election season. Now that we are just ten months into 45’s administration of errors, the one thing I look forward to every week is escaping into the world of Will, Grace, Jack, and Karen. It’s a tiny blip of superficial happiness, but it means so much. Continue reading

Now Is Not The Time To Be Neutral

Now Is Not The Time To Be Neutral

By Jillian Stacia

On Friday, the New York Times released its new Social Media Guidelines for its newsroom.

The guidelines covered a variety of topics, but the one that has everyone talking is its first and most vital point: “In social media posts, our journalists must not express partisan opinions, promote political views, endorse candidates, make offensive comments or do anything else that undercuts The Times’s journalistic reputation.”

And while the intention behind these guidelines is clear: The Times wants to remain a nonbiased organization – it seems impractical and frankly inadvisable to require employees to follow these guidelines in today’s society. Continue reading

How Do We Raise Children In a World Where Mass Shootings Are the Norm?

By Catherine Miele

It’s Wednesday, and we’re still reeling from the news of the horrific mass shooting tragedy in Las Vegas. As desperately as I try, I cannot wrap my mind around the sheer terror and sorrow the survivors and victims’ families undoubtedly feel.

I don’t want to wrap my mind around it, truthfully, because humans shouldn’t be able to conjure such hurt and hatred. We do it here in America—more frequently than other developed nations, might I add—but we shouldn’t have to wake up to this and make sense of something utterly senseless. Continue reading

We Don’t Need Thoughts And Prayers — We Need Stronger Gun Laws

By Molly Burford

On December 14, 2012, Adam Lanza entered the halls of Sandy Hook Elementary School with three guns in tow and opened fire. 26 people (20 students and 6 adult staff members) were killed. The child victims of the attack were ages six and seven. It was after this horrendous tragedy that stole young and innocent lives that America vowed, “Never again.”

But, unfortunately, it did happen again. And again. And again. Continue reading

A Letter to My Unborn Son in the Wake of the Las Vegas Shooting

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By Jillian Stacia

This is a letter written to my unborn son on the day of the Las Vegas shooting. I plan to give it to him when he is older and able to responsibly understand today’s events. I am currently 31 weeks pregnant.

Dear You,

I woke up today to terrible news. 50 people dead in Las Vegas. Another mass shooting, the worst in modern American history.

My heart feels heavy, and I can’t seem to focus on anything. All my other responsibilities feel trivial and unimportant. My mind is numb and my body feels sluggish. This is becoming an all too familiar feeling in America. Continue reading