6 Must-Reads for Women’s History Month

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By Joanna Grey Talbot

History is full of women who, in spite of many challenges and roadblocks, pursued a life of courage, determination, and passion. They impacted science, the arts, politics, sports, and every other area of life. Some even risked their lives in order to free the oppressed and lift up the downtrodden. As we celebrate Women’s History Month this far-from-comprehensive list will help you learn about a few of them and be inspired by their stories. Continue reading

Mean (Boss)Girls: 4 Bad Habits That Are Good For Your Hustle

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By Eliza David

When it comes to your career, are you putting your best foot forward? Well, stop wasting your time! Your bad boss behavior might be more helpful than you think.

To err is human, allegedly, so there will be times in your professional life where you let your not-so-nice side get the better of you.  Well, your resident GirlBoss Guru is here to tell you that your bad habits – when executed from a different perspective – can prove to be some of your most useful tools in business. Continue reading

We Are The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For

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By Jillian Stacia

I’ve spent my entire life waiting to become.

When I was a little girl, I thought I would have it figured out by the time I was 16. I glorified 16. It sounded like such a fun and sophisticated age. I would have a boyfriend and a job and a car. I would know what I was doing. I’d be confident and capable and fun and smart. By 16, surely, I would’ve arrived. I would’ve already become. Continue reading

Let Yourself Be Seen

By Kate Kole

On Wednesday, I wrote about the conversation surrounding Lady Gaga’s body after her Super Bowl performance. That same day, 2 girlfriends of mine began the #loveyourbellymovement. They shared pictures showcasing their bellies as a way to embrace who they are, to be proud of what they’re working with, to support other women, and to promote self-love.

I was so inspired. I grabbed my camera, flipped it, reversed it, and snapped a picture to share on social media. Continue reading

I Didn’t Think I Was A Feminist

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By Laura Mitchell-­Ghafoor

I didn’t used to be a feminist. Or at least, identify as a feminist. I used to say, “Feminism? Not my cup of tea, thanks.” I had an argument once about how celebrities arguing over trivial things and labelling it as feminism diluted their argument and that was why I wasn’t a feminist; like equality could be compared to squash mixed with too much water at a barbecue in summer. I wasn’t militant. I wasn’t born in the days when women couldn’t have jobs, and right then, there were more pressing issues, thank you very much.

Only – and it’s been difficult to say this in the past, although the more you say it the slightly easier it becomes- I was entirely wrong.

Yes, I am a feminist.

Continue reading

Real Women Are…

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By Kate Kole

I was glued to Lady Gaga’s performance at the Super Bowl. Her dancing, her singing, her trust in suspension cables. I made a joke to my husband that she needs to come teach my fitness classes, as I’m usually winded just talking in the midst of squat jumps and mountain climbers, and she could likely belt Born This Way, miraculously hitting each note while jumping high and landing low. Continue reading

Thank You, Trump…

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By Catherine Miele

Before you click that “x” in the corner of your screen, please keep reading and know this is NOT that kind of post.

I’m a registered Democrat although I have voted and always will vote for issues over party. I proudly and almost tearfully voted for Hillary Clinton, and I do not believe that Trump’s values are my values. In a sense, I’m #stillwithher and every single woman who marched—in the flesh or in spirit—on January 21. Continue reading

What The Chicago Women’s March Taught Me

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By Megan Kramer

When I first heard about the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., that would follow the inauguration of Donald Trump, I was determined to join. It felt like the first real action I could take to potentially make a difference—an action that would fly in the face of the sexist, racist, divisive rhetoric coming from Trump and his cabinet.

I booked a plane ticket from Chicago and made lodging plans that wouldn’t break the bank, but, unfortunately, those lodging plans fell through at the last minute. Unable to find another affordable and safe option in time, I decided I would go to the Chicago Women’s March instead. I was disappointed I wouldn’t make it to D.C., but little did I know that marching in Chicago would turn out to be even more inspiring. Continue reading