Now Is Not The Time To Be Neutral

Now Is Not The Time To Be Neutral

By Jillian Stacia

On Friday, the New York Times released its new Social Media Guidelines for its newsroom.

The guidelines covered a variety of topics, but the one that has everyone talking is its first and most vital point: “In social media posts, our journalists must not express partisan opinions, promote political views, endorse candidates, make offensive comments or do anything else that undercuts The Times’s journalistic reputation.”

And while the intention behind these guidelines is clear: The Times wants to remain a nonbiased organization – it seems impractical and frankly inadvisable to require employees to follow these guidelines in today’s society. Continue reading

How Do We Raise Children In a World Where Mass Shootings Are the Norm?

By Catherine Miele

It’s Wednesday, and we’re still reeling from the news of the horrific mass shooting tragedy in Las Vegas. As desperately as I try, I cannot wrap my mind around the sheer terror and sorrow the survivors and victims’ families undoubtedly feel.

I don’t want to wrap my mind around it, truthfully, because humans shouldn’t be able to conjure such hurt and hatred. We do it here in America—more frequently than other developed nations, might I add—but we shouldn’t have to wake up to this and make sense of something utterly senseless. Continue reading

We Don’t Need Thoughts And Prayers — We Need Stronger Gun Laws

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By Molly Burford

On December 14, 2012, Adam Lanza entered the halls of Sandy Hook Elementary School with three guns in tow and opened fire. 26 people (20 students and 6 adult staff members) were killed. The child victims of the attack were ages six and seven. It was after this horrendous tragedy that stole young and innocent lives that America vowed, “Never again.”

But, unfortunately, it did happen again. And again. And again. Continue reading

This Is The Real Question of the 2016 Election

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By Jillian Stacia

It happened for the first time in 2000, when I was in the fifth grade. I took out my favorite purple gel pen and checked the box for Al Gore, proudly casting my vote in our mock elementary school election. I had a small smile on my face when I walked back to my seat, knowing that I had done my part to help elect the next president of the United States. When they announced George W. Bush as the winner that very same afternoon, I was heartbroken. And when the chorus of cheers erupted around me, I was thoroughly confused. Why did all my friends pick someone else? Did my parents know about this Bush guy? Continue reading

What Now? One Woman’s Take On The Aftermath Of Brexit

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By Kirsten Parnell

On Thursday June 23, a referendum was held on whether the UK should remain part of the European Union. Of the 33.5 million people who turned out to vote, 51.9% voted to leave. To say this came as a shock is a huge understatement – which sounds crazy, I know. It was a referendum, it could only go one of two ways – surely we were prepared for a “Leave” vote on some level? Continue reading

We Stand With Kesha

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A week ago, the hashtag #FreeKesha was trending on Twitter, while dozens of fans with posters displaying the same slogan stood outside a New York courtroom. Since that day when her request for an injunction was denied,  there have literally been dozens of articles, thinkpieces, and open letters published. The Kesha case has touched so many people, and that’s because, at its heart, it is a sad reminder of the world in which we live. Continue reading