Now Is Not The Time To Be Neutral

Now Is Not The Time To Be Neutral

By Jillian Stacia

On Friday, the New York Times released its new Social Media Guidelines for its newsroom.

The guidelines covered a variety of topics, but the one that has everyone talking is its first and most vital point: “In social media posts, our journalists must not express partisan opinions, promote political views, endorse candidates, make offensive comments or do anything else that undercuts The Times’s journalistic reputation.”

And while the intention behind these guidelines is clear: The Times wants to remain a nonbiased organization – it seems impractical and frankly inadvisable to require employees to follow these guidelines in today’s society. Continue reading

We’re Going To Be Okay

We're Going To Be Okay

By Jillian Stacia

It’s been a rough couple of days. If you live in America then you know what I mean.

When things like this happen, I find myself falling silent. Not in my personal life, or on social media, or in my own private journals, but here, in this space. More than ever, I’m realizing just how important our words are. I want to make sure I get them right. I don’t want to be another voice in the void. I don’t want to add more fuel to the fire. I don’t want to say something just because. Continue reading

Raising A Child In The Trump Administration

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By Jillian Stacia

Recently, Thirty On Tap contributor Catherine Miele wrote about how she’s scared to have a second child in today’s political landscape. I’m currently pregnant with my first child and can completely relate to Catherine’s feelings. I’ve found myself thinking about this more and more with every passing news story. I’m insecure about so many things when it comes to motherhood, but nothing scares me more than having to raise a child in the Trump Administration. Continue reading

Why I’m Scared to Have a Second Child

Thoughts On Having Kids In Today's World

By Catherine Miele

I am an only child, and so is my husband.

As a result of my upbringing, I’ve always imagined having at least two children.

That’s not to say my two-year-old son is less than my entire world – after all, his perfectly fitting name means “bringer of light” – yet I, perhaps selfishly, want him to know what it’s like to have a best friend in the form of a brother or sister.

But (because there’s always a but) I’m scared to try. Continue reading

America Doesn’t Deserve a Birthday Party This Year

By De Elizabeth

The Fourth of July feels different this year.

While I appreciate having time off from work, a chance to sleep in, and several hours to devote to spending time outside and in the sunshine, I don’t really have a desire to celebrate in any traditional ways. I don’t want to barbecue, eat red white and blue ice pops, bake an apple pie, or put on a stars-n-striped bathing suit. I don’t want to go watch fireworks or Instagram myself on a pool float. I don’t want to do any of these things because Donald Trump is president, and I’m truly afraid for our country’s future.  Continue reading

No, Your Pre-Existing Condition Isn’t Your Fault

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By Catherine Miele

Once again, the majority Republican Congress is pushing the American Health Care Act – healthcare overhaul, although overhaul is too gentle a word – approval. Last week, the House passed the AHCA with a 1-point margin.

The bill still has to pass the Senate and will likely (hopefully) undergo many changes, but that doesn’t mean some lawmakers weren’t celebrating their promise to decimate healthcare as we know it. Continue reading

What The Chicago Women’s March Taught Me

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By Megan Kramer

When I first heard about the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., that would follow the inauguration of Donald Trump, I was determined to join. It felt like the first real action I could take to potentially make a difference—an action that would fly in the face of the sexist, racist, divisive rhetoric coming from Trump and his cabinet.

I booked a plane ticket from Chicago and made lodging plans that wouldn’t break the bank, but, unfortunately, those lodging plans fell through at the last minute. Unable to find another affordable and safe option in time, I decided I would go to the Chicago Women’s March instead. I was disappointed I wouldn’t make it to D.C., but little did I know that marching in Chicago would turn out to be even more inspiring. Continue reading

15 Times The Internet Had The Last Laugh During the 2016 Election

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By De Elizabeth

You guys, we did it. We got to November 8. The countdown is officially over; today is the day. In honor of our survival, and in anticipation of what is bound to be an anxiety-filled day, we are taking a minute to laugh. Remember when all we could do, amid the chaos and insanity that was the 2016 election, was just laugh? If it weren’t for the Internet, we probably would have lost our goddamn minds throughout the past few months. In honor of our survival, we’re rounding up the 15 funniest things that happened online throughout the election season. And after you’re done reading and laughing, GO OUT AND VOTE.  Continue reading

This Is The Real Question of the 2016 Election

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By Jillian Stacia

It happened for the first time in 2000, when I was in the fifth grade. I took out my favorite purple gel pen and checked the box for Al Gore, proudly casting my vote in our mock elementary school election. I had a small smile on my face when I walked back to my seat, knowing that I had done my part to help elect the next president of the United States. When they announced George W. Bush as the winner that very same afternoon, I was heartbroken. And when the chorus of cheers erupted around me, I was thoroughly confused. Why did all my friends pick someone else? Did my parents know about this Bush guy? Continue reading