What The Chicago Women’s March Taught Me

chicago

By Megan Kramer

When I first heard about the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., that would follow the inauguration of Donald Trump, I was determined to join. It felt like the first real action I could take to potentially make a difference—an action that would fly in the face of the sexist, racist, divisive rhetoric coming from Trump and his cabinet.

I booked a plane ticket from Chicago and made lodging plans that wouldn’t break the bank, but, unfortunately, those lodging plans fell through at the last minute. Unable to find another affordable and safe option in time, I decided I would go to the Chicago Women’s March instead. I was disappointed I wouldn’t make it to D.C., but little did I know that marching in Chicago would turn out to be even more inspiring. Continue reading

How Teen Vogue Is Paving The Way For The Future Of Feminism

large

By Jillian Stacia

Journalism is changing in the post President-Elect Trump world. Publications are testing their limits and redefining their values. They’re fine tuning their voice and reexamining their commitments and ethics. It’s been an interesting transition to watch, but nothing has been more fulfilling than witnessing Teen Vogue pave the way for young feminists across the country.

In case you missed it, this article by Lauren Duca went viral a few weeks ago for its bold analysis of Trump’s psychological manipulation of the American people. She received even more recognition when she appeared on Tucker Carlson Tonight and fought back against Tucker’s sexism and demeaning comments. Her quick wit, class, and unwavering passion made her an instant icon for young feminists across the world. Continue reading

15 Times The Internet Had The Last Laugh During the 2016 Election

bc_308_prevhl1_thumbnail

By De Elizabeth

You guys, we did it. We got to November 8. The countdown is officially over; today is the day. In honor of our survival, and in anticipation of what is bound to be an anxiety-filled day, we are taking a minute to laugh. Remember when all we could do, amid the chaos and insanity that was the 2016 election, was just laugh? If it weren’t for the Internet, we probably would have lost our goddamn minds throughout the past few months. In honor of our survival, we’re rounding up the 15 funniest things that happened online throughout the election season. And after you’re done reading and laughing, GO OUT AND VOTE.  Continue reading

This Is The Real Question of the 2016 Election

photo-1466780446965-2072a3de8a43

By Jillian Stacia

It happened for the first time in 2000, when I was in the fifth grade. I took out my favorite purple gel pen and checked the box for Al Gore, proudly casting my vote in our mock elementary school election. I had a small smile on my face when I walked back to my seat, knowing that I had done my part to help elect the next president of the United States. When they announced George W. Bush as the winner that very same afternoon, I was heartbroken. And when the chorus of cheers erupted around me, I was thoroughly confused. Why did all my friends pick someone else? Did my parents know about this Bush guy? Continue reading

This Is Why I Get So Angry When You Insult Hillary Clinton

90

By Jillian Stacia

The personal is political. This is one of the most commonly recognized feminist arguments. It highlights the connection between what goes on in a woman’s personal life and the current political infrastructure. Essentially, it means that you are not alone- that what you go through on a day to day, moment by moment basis is not something to ignore or discredit, because it’s not just “your problem”. It’s not individual, it’s collective. It’s a call for the government to defend and reflect the values and needs of women in the same way it defends and reflects the values and needs of men.

But with this election, I’m learning that the reverse is also true. Not only is the personal political, but the political is also incredibly personal. Continue reading

What Now? One Woman’s Take On The Aftermath Of Brexit

person-woman-park-music

By Kirsten Parnell

On Thursday June 23, a referendum was held on whether the UK should remain part of the European Union. Of the 33.5 million people who turned out to vote, 51.9% voted to leave. To say this came as a shock is a huge understatement – which sounds crazy, I know. It was a referendum, it could only go one of two ways – surely we were prepared for a “Leave” vote on some level? Continue reading

PSA: It’s Okay To Care About Celebrities

hollywood

By De and Kate

Meeting your future sister-in-law can be an intimidating experience. Lucky for us, the introduction was made easier by an instant connection over reality TV. More specifically, Season 7 of The Bachelorette. Upon meeting, we spent hours watching Ashley Hebert in her quest for love and took turns talking (perhaps sometimes yelling) at the TV, as our relationship advice needed to be heard.  Continue reading

Mental Health And Our Vets: A Conversation That Needs To Happen

pexels-photo

By Kristina Leigh

Since 1949, May has been observed as America’s National Mental Health Awareness Month. As our world becomes more intertwined yet somehow still fractured, populations grow alongside income disparity and poverty, and many of the world powers, including America, are drawn into protracted wars that demand a heavy military presence, mental health issues affect more and more people each day. One group that is severely affected is our returning veterans.  Continue reading