The Truth About Postpartum Anxiety

By Becky Houdesheldt

While I sat rocking my daughter in her nursery last night, trying yet another position to get her to go back to sleep, I closed my eyes and rested my lips on her head. I tried to remind myself to relish the time with her while she’s small. She turns 5 months tomorrow, and I lost my first two months with her to postpartum anxiety.

My anxiety robbed me of enjoying my first weeks with her. I honestly thought I was on top of my symptoms. I wasn’t. I finally admitted I needed more help after I acknowledged I was experiencing intrusive thoughts, and it took me 5 weeks before I could get in to a postpartum specialist.

I couldn’t call my daughter by her name. I didn’t want to look at her. I couldn’t be alone with my thoughts because I’d lose myself in a whirlwind of fears and anxieties that I knew weren’t rooted in reality, but I couldn’t pull myself out of them. I felt out of control, out of touch, and at a loss. I returned to a new job after 6 weeks at home, and I was a mess.

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10 Postpartum Things We Need To Discuss

By De and Kate

Having a baby can certainly be a beautiful, miraculous, life-changing experience. It can also be summed up as a lot. A lot of hormones, a lot of emotions, and a lot of wtf is happening in my body right now moments. We often see and share the blissful postpartum snapshots, but we don’t always get into the less than glamorous, nitty-gritty details. That said, we’re here to help a pregnant girlfriend out and dive into what those first couple postpartum months are really like. You’re welcome, and also, we’re so sorry. Continue reading

The Price You Pay When You’re Always Trying to Live in the Moment

By De Elizabeth

Every summer when growing up, my family would take trips to Cape Cod. My brother and I would spend the days leading up to our trip rifling through our CD collections, deciding which albums to bring with us for the six-hour drive (Blink-182, SR-71, and, later, Motion City Soundtrack were always among the top of the list). We’d print out a list of every state in the country, awarding various values to each, ready to play the License Plate Game in the car (Alaska and Hawaii always had the highest amount of points). We’d joke that every year, our parents would get into their “annual fight” before we left, delaying our departure by at least 45 minutes, but then eventually we’d be on our way. We’d stop around lunchtime — in Mystic, Connecticut, at a Friendly’s restaurant just off of the highway. Then, several hours later, we’d cross the Sagamore Bridge onto the Cape, and every year, at this very moment, my mom would turn around, look at us, and say: “Savor the moment.” Continue reading

10 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me About Labor, Delivery, and Postpartum

By De Elizabeth

This weekend, my brand-new baby girl will be one month old. The past four weeks were somehow simultaneously the longest and fastest weeks of my life, as they’ve amassed to one big blur of 2am feeding sessions, 5pm snuggles, and a lot of unwashed hair. (Mine, not hers.)

Having a baby was undoubtedly the biggest transition of my entire life, and for as much as I studied, read, and took the necessary classes, there was a lot I wasn’t prepared for. After all, how do you really prepare for something that you’ve never experienced before?  Continue reading

Expect the Unexpected When You’re Expecting

Expect the Unexpected When You’re Expecting.jpg

By Kristin Christopoulos

When I found out I was pregnant – I freaked out. My husband and I were trying to have a baby, so you’d think I would have been aware that this was a possibility. But the thing about pregnancy and child birth is that pretty much everything you think you know about it turns out to be misguided, misrepresented, or just flat out wrong. So even though I was actively hoping for and trying to become pregnant, I still lost my shit when it happened.

It took about a month and a half for the fog I felt to lift, and I started to actually enjoy the thought of having a baby, instead of just freaking out that we weren’t ready, didn’t have enough money, our lives were about to change forever, etc. Continue reading